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Cabinets of Wisdom is an experimental exhibition by Finlandia Vodka which provokes the visitors to experience an unfamiliar side of well-known Bulgarian wisdoms.

Play around with words, discover the artworks and learn more about the concepts behind them.

EXPLORE

Match the wisdoms to see them reimagined as artworks.

  • The tongue has no bones,
    but bones it can break

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    MEANING

    Words are immaterial, but can inflict a lot of pain.

    INTERPRETATION

    “I chose this proverb because of its playfulness and wit stance. I looked at the phrase from a material point of view, which steered the visuality towards a more abstract expression. I used contrasting materials; thick wooden blocks and thin see-through fabric. The work is essentially all about visual strength. Wood would generally be thought to be much stronger than fabric, but with composition and use of colour, the visual strength can be very different.”

    Antti
    Kalevi

    AUTHOR

    An Aalto graduate, Antti spent some time working in Reykjavik and dreams of taking his studio on the road. For now he’s concentrating on editorial illustration, textile design, ceramics and other commissions, and is happy in his work as long as he retains his trademark playfulness. In the future he’d like to use his fun, analogue and digital skills to create large, indoor murals and design and illustrate his own set of umbrellas.

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  • Drop by drop —
    a pond forms.

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    MEANING

    If persistent, even the smallest of effort could lead to big results.

    INTERPRETATION

    “The Silky Sifaka is a endangered lemur species from the island of Madagascar. In an absurd narrative, it has found itself trapped in a cabinet. Lonely without its fellow Sifakas and familiar environment, it has cried a pool of tears which in turn has led to the growth of giant anemone flowers. Teardrop by teardrop a luscious jungle is forming. The piece is engraved and painted on flat plywood panels, in a style evoking old-fashioned theatre sets.”

    Eero
    Lampinen

    AUTHOR

    Eero Lampinen is a Helsinki-based illustrator who incorporates elements of mythology and folklore into modern settings, often blurring the lines between reality and fantasy. Most often he works with ink and watercolor before editing digitally. Eero Lampinen’s art is a candy-coloured cauldron of folkloric characters and dark stories articulated in a style that meshes Studio Ghibli with My Little Pony with a dash of pop culture thrown in for good measure. His professional work includes a lot of editorial work and conceptual creative commissions.

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  • If you pretend to be a lamb,
    the wolf shall eat you.

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    MEANING

    If you play the victim, you eventually become one.

    INTERPRETATION

    “Glass is extremely delicate no matter what the format is. Glass has the tendency to capture and save even the most delicate moment in the process: the degree, purity and poetic silence. The traces of the maker are the beat in the work and the rhythm of that beat is the power more stronger and unbreakable than the indulgent surface. The heat from the fire, the power of the kiln and the vigorous hands that have created the form gives a strength to pieces with an unbreakable aura.”

    Iina
    Vuorivirta

    AUTHOR

    Iina Vuorivirta is a young Finnish designer with her background in Arts and Crafts. Her education has passed through the three most renowned design academies in the Scandinavian region. She has worked actively with exhibitions and various collaborations. Vuorivirta’s work is always in a close relationship with the craftspeople. She believes in the name of unique aesthetic and the emotional charge that only the human hand and brain can give to an object.

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  • You get to Constantinople
    by asking questions.

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    MEANING

    People are reluctant to ask questions, but asking them can take you places.

    INTERPRETATION

    “This cabinet states that the most interesting miracles can be found from our everyday surroundings. From places we are already familiar with. We just need to be curious, ask questions and discover. Our everyday surroundings already hold the substance of cabinets of curiosities. The “Everyday Miracles” cabinet presents natural phenomena that is known by everyone and exists everywhere: Gravity, Water, Air and Electricity. The cabinet visualizes these invisible everyday phenomena that give form to Earth and all things on it. Presenting these phenomena through a spectrum of manmade materials — plastics and synthetic fibers, to highlight that all things existing on this planet are governed by the same natural laws, both natural and manmade elements.”

    Kirsi
    Enkovaara

    AUTHOR

    Kirsi Enkovaara is a Finnish designer and artist. She holds a degree both in Fine Art and Product Design. After graduating from the Royal College of Art, Design Products in 2014 she based her studio in London. The focus of her products and installations lays on examining the behavior of nature, human and the connection points with the natural and manmade reality. Her works has exhibited extensively through Europe most recently during the London Design Festival 2016. Her work has been featured in the frontrunner publications such as Dezeen, Wallpaper and Frame Magazine.

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  • Not every tree
    can a whistle make.

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    MEANING

    Certain tasks or roles in life are not for everybody.

    INTERPRETATION

    “I use the proverb as a basis for a new light series — “Seasons in the Mystic Forest”. In every aspect, Finland’s culture and people are closely related to their forests. It is even common for a Finnish person to describe the different capabilities and personality traits of people by drawing comparisons to trees. In my installation the different shapes, colours and lights depict the diverse characters and skill sets of people. Some of the mystic trees are more flashy than others. Some hide their light under their foliage, while others emit only a subtle blink once in a while.”

    Marjukka
    Takala

    AUTHOR

    Marjukka Takala (born 1982 in Vantaa, Finland) is an independent designer in Helsinki. She studied Ceramics and Glass Design (BA) and Applied Arts (MA) at the Aalto University. Meanwhile she completed an internship at Iittala. For her work, she received several scholarships from the The Arts Promotion Centre Finland and a grant from the Iittala Group. Her ceramics and glass designs are exhibited worldwide. She is a founding member of the UKLY Association for New Ceramics and Glass, Finland.

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  • A hurried job
    is shame for the craftsman.

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    MEANING

    A rushed job would bring shame upon your name.

    INTERPRETATION

    “With our cabinet of curiosity, we wanted to create a place one can sit and take a break. A place to calm down and collect your thoughts in this modern, hyperactive world. To achieve this feeling we relied on Nordic hand-drawn aesthetics, combined with materials found in nature.”

    Saana ja
    Olli

    AUTHORS

    Saana ja Olli is a designer couple and an award-winning design company from Turku. They produce durable 100% hemp textile collections, manufactured transparently in Southwestern Finland. In their works Saana ja Olli pay tribute to sustainability , timelessness and the human touch. Their products reflect the beautiful solitude of nature through clean lines and stylish patterns. Saana ja Olli collaborate with local companies as well as some from Japan, France and Sweden. Their collections have been featured in Monocle.

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BULGARIAN PROVERBS SEEN THROUGH
THE EYES OF FINNISH ARTISTS

Cabinets of Wisdom is an experimental exhibition by Finlandia Vodka which provokes the visitors to experience an unfamiliar side of well-known Bulgarian wisdoms.

Six contemporary Finnish artists reimagined six Bulgarian proverbs encased in the specially-constructed Cabinets of Wisdom.

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